The Coase Theorem and squatting on Crown Land and water : A Hong Kong comparative study of the differences between the state allocation of property rights for two kinds of squatters

Lawrence W.C. LAI*, Mark H. CHUA, Frank T. LORNE

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Journal PublicationsJournal Article (refereed)peer-review

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper compares the way the state allocates property rights to land and marine squatters in Colonial Hong Kong, where property rights were clearly defined and the state resourceful and effective. It explains with reference to the Coase Theorem the consequences of the state conferring property rights to squatters - notably why the granting of tradable rehousing entitlements to Crown Land squatters had the effect of restraining the extent of in-situ upgrades and why non-tradable, but formal, licenses were allocated to marine squatters. The implications of each form of rights granted to squatters are discussed in relation to innovation-oriented public policies.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)247-257
Number of pages11
JournalHabitat International
Volume44
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Oct 2014
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2014 Elsevier Ltd.

Keywords

  • Aquaculture
  • Coase Theorem
  • Innovations
  • Market transactions
  • Property rights
  • Squatting

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