The complete work

Kelly TROGDON, Paisley LIVINGSTON

Research output: Journal PublicationsJournal Article (refereed)Researchpeer-review

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

What is it for a work of art to be complete? In this article, we argue that an artwork is complete just in case the artist has acquired a completion disposition with respect to her work - a disposition grounded in certain cognitive mechanisms to refrain from making significant changes to the work. We begin by explaining why the complete/ incomplete distinction with respect to artworks is both practically and philosophically significant. Then we consider and reject two approaches to artwork completion. Finally, we set out and defend our own account.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)225-233
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism
Volume72
Issue number3
Early online date25 Jul 2014
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

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Artwork
Complete Work
Disposition
Completion
Incomplete
Artist
Works of Art

Cite this

TROGDON, Kelly ; LIVINGSTON, Paisley . / The complete work. In: Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism. 2014 ; Vol. 72, No. 3. pp. 225-233.
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The complete work. / TROGDON, Kelly; LIVINGSTON, Paisley .

In: Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism, Vol. 72, No. 3, 2014, p. 225-233.

Research output: Journal PublicationsJournal Article (refereed)Researchpeer-review

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