The Daily Motivators

Positive Work Events, Psychological Needs Satisfaction, and Work Engagement

Nan WANG, Jinlong ZHU*, Christian DORMANN, Zhaoli SONG, Arnold B. BAKKER

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Journal PublicationsJournal Article (refereed)Researchpeer-review

Abstract

This study examines the motivational effects of daily positive work events. Drawing on self-determination theory, we investigated the motivational mechanism of two clusters of commonly encountered positive work events—achievement and recognition events—from a within-person perspective. Specifically, we argue that achievement events and recognition events influence subsequent work engagement through satisfying different psychological needs. We tested our model using experience-sampling data from 200 full-time employees over eight workdays. As hypothesised, after controlling for positive affect as an additional mediator, both achievement and recognition events had positive effects on work engagement through psychological needs satisfaction. The results also revealed that achievement and recognition work events had differentiated effects in satisfying different psychological needs. These results shed light on the motivational function of positive work events above and beyond the affective mechanism and explicate the processes through which different types of positive work events relate to work engagement.

Original languageEnglish
JournalApplied Psychology
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 24 Nov 2018

Fingerprint

Job Satisfaction
Psychology
Personal Autonomy
Psychological

Cite this

WANG, Nan ; ZHU, Jinlong ; DORMANN, Christian ; SONG, Zhaoli ; BAKKER, Arnold B. / The Daily Motivators : Positive Work Events, Psychological Needs Satisfaction, and Work Engagement. In: Applied Psychology. 2018.
@article{222b4efa130143b6b3c7889249afdeb0,
title = "The Daily Motivators: Positive Work Events, Psychological Needs Satisfaction, and Work Engagement",
abstract = "This study examines the motivational effects of daily positive work events. Drawing on self-determination theory, we investigated the motivational mechanism of two clusters of commonly encountered positive work events—achievement and recognition events—from a within-person perspective. Specifically, we argue that achievement events and recognition events influence subsequent work engagement through satisfying different psychological needs. We tested our model using experience-sampling data from 200 full-time employees over eight workdays. As hypothesised, after controlling for positive affect as an additional mediator, both achievement and recognition events had positive effects on work engagement through psychological needs satisfaction. The results also revealed that achievement and recognition work events had differentiated effects in satisfying different psychological needs. These results shed light on the motivational function of positive work events above and beyond the affective mechanism and explicate the processes through which different types of positive work events relate to work engagement.",
author = "Nan WANG and Jinlong ZHU and Christian DORMANN and Zhaoli SONG and BAKKER, {Arnold B.}",
year = "2018",
month = "11",
day = "24",
doi = "10.1111/apps.12182",
language = "English",
journal = "Applied Psychology",
issn = "0269-994X",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd",

}

The Daily Motivators : Positive Work Events, Psychological Needs Satisfaction, and Work Engagement. / WANG, Nan; ZHU, Jinlong; DORMANN, Christian; SONG, Zhaoli; BAKKER, Arnold B.

In: Applied Psychology, 24.11.2018.

Research output: Journal PublicationsJournal Article (refereed)Researchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - The Daily Motivators

T2 - Positive Work Events, Psychological Needs Satisfaction, and Work Engagement

AU - WANG, Nan

AU - ZHU, Jinlong

AU - DORMANN, Christian

AU - SONG, Zhaoli

AU - BAKKER, Arnold B.

PY - 2018/11/24

Y1 - 2018/11/24

N2 - This study examines the motivational effects of daily positive work events. Drawing on self-determination theory, we investigated the motivational mechanism of two clusters of commonly encountered positive work events—achievement and recognition events—from a within-person perspective. Specifically, we argue that achievement events and recognition events influence subsequent work engagement through satisfying different psychological needs. We tested our model using experience-sampling data from 200 full-time employees over eight workdays. As hypothesised, after controlling for positive affect as an additional mediator, both achievement and recognition events had positive effects on work engagement through psychological needs satisfaction. The results also revealed that achievement and recognition work events had differentiated effects in satisfying different psychological needs. These results shed light on the motivational function of positive work events above and beyond the affective mechanism and explicate the processes through which different types of positive work events relate to work engagement.

AB - This study examines the motivational effects of daily positive work events. Drawing on self-determination theory, we investigated the motivational mechanism of two clusters of commonly encountered positive work events—achievement and recognition events—from a within-person perspective. Specifically, we argue that achievement events and recognition events influence subsequent work engagement through satisfying different psychological needs. We tested our model using experience-sampling data from 200 full-time employees over eight workdays. As hypothesised, after controlling for positive affect as an additional mediator, both achievement and recognition events had positive effects on work engagement through psychological needs satisfaction. The results also revealed that achievement and recognition work events had differentiated effects in satisfying different psychological needs. These results shed light on the motivational function of positive work events above and beyond the affective mechanism and explicate the processes through which different types of positive work events relate to work engagement.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85060763647&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/apps.12182

DO - 10.1111/apps.12182

M3 - Journal Article (refereed)

JO - Applied Psychology

JF - Applied Psychology

SN - 0269-994X

ER -