The effects of managerial activities on managerial success and effectiveness

Chung Ming LAU, Ignace NG, Mee Kau NYAW

    Research output: Journal PublicationsJournal Article (refereed)Researchpeer-review

    1 Scopus Citations

    Abstract

    The purpose of this paper is to identify the influence of managerial activities on the success and effectiveness of managers using data collected from Canadian, Hong Kong and Taiwanese managers. The results show that for all 3 samples, "effective" activities are different from "successful" activities, which therefore implies that Kerr's (Kerr, 1995) folly of "rewarding A, while hoping for B" holds across national boundaries. In the Canadian case, while none of the managerial activities is related to success, traditional activities improve unit performance. In Taiwan, communications activities enhance managerial success. None of their activities however affects unit performance. The Hong Kong results show that HRM and networking activities are detrimental to success and effectiveness respectively.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)433-445
    Number of pages13
    JournalInternational Business Review
    Volume6
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 1997

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    Hong Kong
    Managers
    Networking
    Taiwan
    Communication

    Cite this

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    The effects of managerial activities on managerial success and effectiveness. / LAU, Chung Ming; NG, Ignace; NYAW, Mee Kau.

    In: International Business Review, Vol. 6, No. 4, 01.01.1997, p. 433-445.

    Research output: Journal PublicationsJournal Article (refereed)Researchpeer-review

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