The efficacy of cognitive behavioral therapy for Chinese people: A meta-analysis

Ting Kin Ng, Daniel Fu Keung Wong*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Journal PublicationsJournal Article (refereed)

1 Scopus Citations

Abstract

Objective: Over the past decade, cognitive behavioral therapy has been applied to an increasingly wider range of disorders and problems in Chinese societies. However, no meta-analysis has been conducted to synthesize the studies on cognitive behavioral therapy for Chinese clients. The purpose of this meta-analytic study was to examine the overall efficacy of cognitive behavioral therapy for Chinese people. Method: A literature search was conducted using electronic databases, including Web of Science, PsycINFO and PubMed. Pooled mean effect sizes were calculated using the random-effects model. Results: The literature search identified 55 studies with 6763 Chinese participants. The overall short-term effect of cognitive behavioral therapy on the primary outcome was medium in size. Effect sizes were medium for anxiety, depression/well-being and caregiving stress and small for psychotic symptoms and addictive behaviors. The effects of cognitive behavioral therapy on process variables, dysfunctional thoughts and coping, were in the small range. The overall longer-term effect of cognitive behavioral therapy on the primary outcome was medium in size. Moderator analyses showed that the short-term effect was stronger for culturally adapted cognitive behavioral therapy than for unadapted cognitive behavioral therapy. Type of primary outcome, type of control group, recruitment method, study design, the format of delivery and region were found to moderate the efficacy of cognitive behavioral therapy. Conclusion: The findings of this study provide evidence for the overall efficacy of cognitive behavioral therapy for Chinese people and the benefit of cultural adaptation of cognitive behavioral therapy to Chinese culture.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)620-637
Number of pages18
JournalAustralian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry
Volume52
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jul 2018
Externally publishedYes

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Cognitive Therapy
Meta-Analysis
Addictive Behavior
PubMed
Anxiety
Databases
Depression
Control Groups

Keywords

  • Chinese people
  • cognitive behavioral therapy
  • cultural adaptation
  • Meta-analysis

Cite this

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abstract = "Objective: Over the past decade, cognitive behavioral therapy has been applied to an increasingly wider range of disorders and problems in Chinese societies. However, no meta-analysis has been conducted to synthesize the studies on cognitive behavioral therapy for Chinese clients. The purpose of this meta-analytic study was to examine the overall efficacy of cognitive behavioral therapy for Chinese people. Method: A literature search was conducted using electronic databases, including Web of Science, PsycINFO and PubMed. Pooled mean effect sizes were calculated using the random-effects model. Results: The literature search identified 55 studies with 6763 Chinese participants. The overall short-term effect of cognitive behavioral therapy on the primary outcome was medium in size. Effect sizes were medium for anxiety, depression/well-being and caregiving stress and small for psychotic symptoms and addictive behaviors. The effects of cognitive behavioral therapy on process variables, dysfunctional thoughts and coping, were in the small range. The overall longer-term effect of cognitive behavioral therapy on the primary outcome was medium in size. Moderator analyses showed that the short-term effect was stronger for culturally adapted cognitive behavioral therapy than for unadapted cognitive behavioral therapy. Type of primary outcome, type of control group, recruitment method, study design, the format of delivery and region were found to moderate the efficacy of cognitive behavioral therapy. Conclusion: The findings of this study provide evidence for the overall efficacy of cognitive behavioral therapy for Chinese people and the benefit of cultural adaptation of cognitive behavioral therapy to Chinese culture.",
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The efficacy of cognitive behavioral therapy for Chinese people : A meta-analysis. / Ng, Ting Kin; Wong, Daniel Fu Keung.

In: Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, Vol. 52, No. 7, 01.07.2018, p. 620-637.

Research output: Journal PublicationsJournal Article (refereed)

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