The flipped classroom : two learning modes that foster two learning outcomes

Research output: Journal PublicationsJournal Article (refereed)Researchpeer-review

Abstract

The study involved student teachers enrolled in early childhood teaching at a teacher training institute in Hong Kong Special Administrative Region. Seventy-four students participated in flipped classroom activities during their first semester of study. Students were told to learn from online videos related to using image editing software in their own time and pace prior to the next class. When they met in class, they were asked to apply their recently acquired editing knowledge to edit an image of their own choice related to the theme of their group project. At the end of the activity, students were asked to complete an online questionnaire. It was found that students had rated all five questions relating to generic skills highly, with self-study skills rated the highest. They particularly enjoyed the flexibility of learning on their own time and pace as a benefit of the flipped classroom. Data collected from students’ project pages show they had used average of 3.22 editing features for the theme images for their project. Most groups had inserted text followed by using the filter function. It is possible that these two functions are more noticeable than other editing functions. In conclusion, students were able to apply their self-learnt knowledge in a real-life situation and they had also developed their generic skills via the flipped classroom pedagogy.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)14 - 23
Number of pages9
JournalIssues in Informing Science and Information Technology
Volume13
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2016
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

classroom
learning
student
teachers' training institute
project group
self-study
life situation
student teacher
semester
Hong Kong
flexibility
video
childhood
questionnaire
Teaching
Group
time

Bibliographical note

The author is very thankful to students for participating and allowing her to cite their work and responses. Special thanks go to Pecco Yin for his good research support.

Keywords

  • flipped classroom
  • generic skills
  • online videos
  • photo editing
  • student teacher

Cite this

@article{18259d651d434469b5a84d15e784418a,
title = "The flipped classroom : two learning modes that foster two learning outcomes",
abstract = "The study involved student teachers enrolled in early childhood teaching at a teacher training institute in Hong Kong Special Administrative Region. Seventy-four students participated in flipped classroom activities during their first semester of study. Students were told to learn from online videos related to using image editing software in their own time and pace prior to the next class. When they met in class, they were asked to apply their recently acquired editing knowledge to edit an image of their own choice related to the theme of their group project. At the end of the activity, students were asked to complete an online questionnaire. It was found that students had rated all five questions relating to generic skills highly, with self-study skills rated the highest. They particularly enjoyed the flexibility of learning on their own time and pace as a benefit of the flipped classroom. Data collected from students’ project pages show they had used average of 3.22 editing features for the theme images for their project. Most groups had inserted text followed by using the filter function. It is possible that these two functions are more noticeable than other editing functions. In conclusion, students were able to apply their self-learnt knowledge in a real-life situation and they had also developed their generic skills via the flipped classroom pedagogy.",
keywords = "flipped classroom, generic skills, online videos, photo editing, student teacher",
author = "NG, {Mee Wah Eugenia}",
note = "The author is very thankful to students for participating and allowing her to cite their work and responses. Special thanks go to Pecco Yin for his good research support.",
year = "2016",
month = "3",
language = "English",
volume = "13",
pages = "14 -- 23",
journal = "Issues in Informing Science and Information Technology",
issn = "1547-5840",

}

The flipped classroom : two learning modes that foster two learning outcomes. / NG, Mee Wah Eugenia.

In: Issues in Informing Science and Information Technology, Vol. 13, 03.2016, p. 14 - 23.

Research output: Journal PublicationsJournal Article (refereed)Researchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - The flipped classroom : two learning modes that foster two learning outcomes

AU - NG, Mee Wah Eugenia

N1 - The author is very thankful to students for participating and allowing her to cite their work and responses. Special thanks go to Pecco Yin for his good research support.

PY - 2016/3

Y1 - 2016/3

N2 - The study involved student teachers enrolled in early childhood teaching at a teacher training institute in Hong Kong Special Administrative Region. Seventy-four students participated in flipped classroom activities during their first semester of study. Students were told to learn from online videos related to using image editing software in their own time and pace prior to the next class. When they met in class, they were asked to apply their recently acquired editing knowledge to edit an image of their own choice related to the theme of their group project. At the end of the activity, students were asked to complete an online questionnaire. It was found that students had rated all five questions relating to generic skills highly, with self-study skills rated the highest. They particularly enjoyed the flexibility of learning on their own time and pace as a benefit of the flipped classroom. Data collected from students’ project pages show they had used average of 3.22 editing features for the theme images for their project. Most groups had inserted text followed by using the filter function. It is possible that these two functions are more noticeable than other editing functions. In conclusion, students were able to apply their self-learnt knowledge in a real-life situation and they had also developed their generic skills via the flipped classroom pedagogy.

AB - The study involved student teachers enrolled in early childhood teaching at a teacher training institute in Hong Kong Special Administrative Region. Seventy-four students participated in flipped classroom activities during their first semester of study. Students were told to learn from online videos related to using image editing software in their own time and pace prior to the next class. When they met in class, they were asked to apply their recently acquired editing knowledge to edit an image of their own choice related to the theme of their group project. At the end of the activity, students were asked to complete an online questionnaire. It was found that students had rated all five questions relating to generic skills highly, with self-study skills rated the highest. They particularly enjoyed the flexibility of learning on their own time and pace as a benefit of the flipped classroom. Data collected from students’ project pages show they had used average of 3.22 editing features for the theme images for their project. Most groups had inserted text followed by using the filter function. It is possible that these two functions are more noticeable than other editing functions. In conclusion, students were able to apply their self-learnt knowledge in a real-life situation and they had also developed their generic skills via the flipped classroom pedagogy.

KW - flipped classroom

KW - generic skills

KW - online videos

KW - photo editing

KW - student teacher

M3 - Journal Article (refereed)

VL - 13

SP - 14

EP - 23

JO - Issues in Informing Science and Information Technology

JF - Issues in Informing Science and Information Technology

SN - 1547-5840

ER -