The impact of rumination on internal attention switching

Barbara Chuen Yee Lo, Shun Lau, Sing Hang Cheung, Nicholas B. Allen

Research output: Journal PublicationsJournal Article (refereed)Researchpeer-review

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The present study explored the nature of attention control problems associated with ruminative traits. Experiment 1 aimed to establish the validity of a modified mental counting task that assesses individuals' ability to switch attention between internal mental representations. Reaction time and brain activity (event related potential; ERP) measures were examined, and results showed that the task was sensitive to internal attention switching effects. Experiment 2 assessed how the relationship between ruminative tendencies and switching performance differs when participants attend to neutral versus affective materials under different mood states. Although reaction-time analysis suggested that both mood condition and stimulus affectivity were not significant in altering this association, ERP analysis suggested otherwise. A significant task type×trait rumination × mood condition effect was found for switch-related ERP responses, whereby high ruminators were found to deploy more neuronal resources when switching affective materials in sad mood state.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)209-223
Number of pages15
JournalCognition and Emotion
Volume26
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Feb 2012
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Reaction Time
Aptitude
Evoked Potentials
Mood
Rumination
Brain
Affective
Experiment
Mental Representation
Affectivity
Stimulus
Resources
Event-related Potentials

Keywords

  • Attention switching
  • Event-related potentials
  • Mood effects
  • Rumination
  • Stimulus affectivity
  • Switch costs

Cite this

Lo, Barbara Chuen Yee ; Lau, Shun ; Cheung, Sing Hang ; Allen, Nicholas B. / The impact of rumination on internal attention switching. In: Cognition and Emotion. 2012 ; Vol. 26, No. 2. pp. 209-223.
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The impact of rumination on internal attention switching. / Lo, Barbara Chuen Yee; Lau, Shun; Cheung, Sing Hang; Allen, Nicholas B.

In: Cognition and Emotion, Vol. 26, No. 2, 01.02.2012, p. 209-223.

Research output: Journal PublicationsJournal Article (refereed)Researchpeer-review

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