What if we waited a little longer? The dependent variable problem within the comparative analysis of the welfare state revisited

Research output: Book Chapters | Papers in Conference ProceedingsBook ChapterResearchpeer-review

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Generally regarded as the main trigger for the ‘welfare modelling business’, Esping-Andersen’s (1990) Three Worlds of Welfare Capitalism also heralded the so-called ‘dependent variable problem’ within the comparative analysis of the welfare state. This chapter offers an update, revision and extension of my earlier study (Kühner, 2007): first, it presents a review of recent contributions on the ‘dependent variable problem’; second, it argues, based on comprehensive descriptive analyses of state-of-the-art expenditure and social rights based measures covering 21 OECD countries (1980-2013), that summary indicators of welfare state change continue to struggle producing consistent results for several high-income countries and that Esping-Andersen’s regime typology fails to fully account for these welfare state dynamics. This chapter therefore concludes thatthe dependent variable continues to be a problem of theoretical ambiguity and data operationalisation. It also offers that quantitatively-informed research should continue to focus its efforts on developing disaggregated research frameworks.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationSocial policy review, 27 : Analysis and debate in social policy, 2015
EditorsZoë IRVING, Menno FENGER, John HUDSON
Place of PublicationBristol
PublisherPolicy Press
Chapter10
Pages199-224
Number of pages26
ISBN (Electronic)9781447322795
ISBN (Print)9781447322771
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2015
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • comparative analysis
  • dependent variable problem
  • social expenditure
  • social rights
  • welfare state change
  • welfare state dynamics

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'What if we waited a little longer? The dependent variable problem within the comparative analysis of the welfare state revisited'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this