What Women Do, Believe in, and Financially Contribute - What Matters More in Couples' Decision Making? Gender Inequality in Ghana's Small-Scale Fisheries

Moses ADJEI*, Annie Hau Nung CHAN

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Journal PublicationsJournal Article (refereed)peer-review

Abstract

Studies of couple's decision-making power consistently show that women disproportionately occupy subordinate positions. Using survey data (N = 400) from an ethnographic study on Ghanaian female fisherfolk, we examine the influences of women's financial contributions, ownership of production assets and gender role attitudes, and how they interact with the bodily capacities required to perform different fishery tasks to shape women's decision-making power. Findings show that financial contributions and ownership of production assets remain salient determinants of women's fishery decision-making power. However, their participation in strenuous tasks dampens the positive relationship between their financial contributions, gender role attitudes and decision-making power, such that financial contributions become insignificant. Women's decision-making power varies according to the sex-typed division of labor in small-scale fishing, and those who violate it are ‘punished’—as evident in their decreased decision-making power. Attention to the co-implications of socio-economic forces and material factors such as women's embodied experiences highlights (1) the specificities of occupational sex segregation and decision-making in agricultural sectors of developing economies and (2) how such entanglements can be reconfigured to enhance women's decision-making power in such contexts.
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages32
JournalRural Sociology
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 12 Dec 2022

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This research was supported by Lingnan University, Hong Kong, through its Research Postgraduates studentship Awards [RPG 1134482]. However, the sponsor did not play any role in the design, execution and analysis of data and preparation of this manuscript. We thank the fisherfolks in Ghana who shared their time and experiences with us and the anonymous reviewers for their valuable comments. Address correspondence to Moses Adjei, School of Science and the Environment, Memorial University, Grenfell Campus, Corner Brook, NL A2H 5G4, Canada. Email: mosesadjei@ln.hk

Publisher Copyright:
© 2022 Rural Sociological Society (RSS).

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'What Women Do, Believe in, and Financially Contribute - What Matters More in Couples' Decision Making? Gender Inequality in Ghana's Small-Scale Fisheries'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this