Who is this wonderful battle really fighting? (Or, what the Hong Kong Christian fundamentalists didn’t tell you)

Ching YAU

Research output: Other Conference ContributionsConference Paper (other)Research

Abstract

Tension has been rapidly rising in the past decade between the expanding religious fundamentalist forces in Hong Kong and glocalized movements of sexual rights. Normative institutions including faith-based organizations and megachurches, often joining hands with government bureaucracies, have adopted activist strategies to act in unprecedented unison, and with great speed, triggering waves of moral panic in their umbrella campaigns against sexual minorities and representations including but not limited to pornography, sex workers' and Tongzhi movements. In response to the leftist discourse of moral panic, Christian fundamentalist groups in Hong Kong have coined the alleged liberal critique of morality as "freedom panic" in order to preempt and rationalize their own fears and moralistic stances. "At this moment, we really need not produce 'freedom panic' and should not seek to demoralize Hong Kong society. Rather, we should reaffirm the significant role of morality in our free society, and continue to work hard to find a balance between the two poles" (Hong Kong Sex Culture Society newsletter January 2009). This paper seeks to map the development of cultural discourses within the post-1997 Hong Kong Christian fundamentalist movement. It traces how this movement has learned and modified the lingo of the US Christian Right while it has worked to localize its discourses, restabilize their stronghold and perpetuate their privileges by carefully picking its enemies and reinventing/manipulating the fears of its constituents. Through this analysis, it investigates the movement's complex strategies in blurring the lines between the personal and the political, between politics and religion, and between morality and spirituality.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 17 Jun 2010
Event8th Crossroads in Cultural Studies Conference - Lingnan University, Hong Kong, Hong Kong
Duration: 17 Jun 201020 Jun 2010
http://cultstud.org/xr2010/crossroad/index.html (Event link)

Conference

Conference8th Crossroads in Cultural Studies Conference
CountryHong Kong
CityHong Kong
Period17/06/1020/06/10
OtherThe 8th Crossroads in Cultural Studies Conference will be held in Hong Kong during June 17 – 21, 2010. Hosted by Lingnan University and organized by its Department of Cultural Studies and Kwan Fong Cultural Research and Development Programme, this is the first Crossroads Conference to be held in East Asia.

Started in 1996 in Tampere, Finland, the Crossroads Conferences were to fill what was felt to be a gap in the international cultural studies community. Since then it had become one of the most important international conferences in cultural studies where scholars from all five continents get together to exchange their scholarly insights as well as to get in touch with different cultures. Organized by the Association for Cultural Studies (ACS), Crossroads conference is now held every two years in different parts of the world: Birmingham in UK, Illinois in US, Istanbul in Turkey and Kingston in Jamaica.
Internet address

Fingerprint

Hong Kong
morality
discourse
anxiety
pornography
Pole
spirituality
bureaucracy
privilege
faith
campaign
Religion
minority
worker
politics
Society
Group

Cite this

YAU, C. (2010). Who is this wonderful battle really fighting? (Or, what the Hong Kong Christian fundamentalists didn’t tell you). Paper presented at 8th Crossroads in Cultural Studies Conference, Hong Kong, Hong Kong.
YAU, Ching. / Who is this wonderful battle really fighting? (Or, what the Hong Kong Christian fundamentalists didn’t tell you). Paper presented at 8th Crossroads in Cultural Studies Conference, Hong Kong, Hong Kong.
@conference{3689386f0c494cb59fdd1333ce5ef4db,
title = "Who is this wonderful battle really fighting? (Or, what the Hong Kong Christian fundamentalists didn’t tell you)",
abstract = "Tension has been rapidly rising in the past decade between the expanding religious fundamentalist forces in Hong Kong and glocalized movements of sexual rights. Normative institutions including faith-based organizations and megachurches, often joining hands with government bureaucracies, have adopted activist strategies to act in unprecedented unison, and with great speed, triggering waves of moral panic in their umbrella campaigns against sexual minorities and representations including but not limited to pornography, sex workers' and Tongzhi movements. In response to the leftist discourse of moral panic, Christian fundamentalist groups in Hong Kong have coined the alleged liberal critique of morality as {"}freedom panic{"} in order to preempt and rationalize their own fears and moralistic stances. {"}At this moment, we really need not produce 'freedom panic' and should not seek to demoralize Hong Kong society. Rather, we should reaffirm the significant role of morality in our free society, and continue to work hard to find a balance between the two poles{"} (Hong Kong Sex Culture Society newsletter January 2009). This paper seeks to map the development of cultural discourses within the post-1997 Hong Kong Christian fundamentalist movement. It traces how this movement has learned and modified the lingo of the US Christian Right while it has worked to localize its discourses, restabilize their stronghold and perpetuate their privileges by carefully picking its enemies and reinventing/manipulating the fears of its constituents. Through this analysis, it investigates the movement's complex strategies in blurring the lines between the personal and the political, between politics and religion, and between morality and spirituality.",
author = "Ching YAU",
year = "2010",
month = "6",
day = "17",
language = "English",
note = "8th Crossroads in Cultural Studies Conference ; Conference date: 17-06-2010 Through 20-06-2010",
url = "http://cultstud.org/xr2010/crossroad/index.html",

}

YAU, C 2010, 'Who is this wonderful battle really fighting? (Or, what the Hong Kong Christian fundamentalists didn’t tell you)' Paper presented at 8th Crossroads in Cultural Studies Conference, Hong Kong, Hong Kong, 17/06/10 - 20/06/10, .

Who is this wonderful battle really fighting? (Or, what the Hong Kong Christian fundamentalists didn’t tell you). / YAU, Ching.

2010. Paper presented at 8th Crossroads in Cultural Studies Conference, Hong Kong, Hong Kong.

Research output: Other Conference ContributionsConference Paper (other)Research

TY - CONF

T1 - Who is this wonderful battle really fighting? (Or, what the Hong Kong Christian fundamentalists didn’t tell you)

AU - YAU, Ching

PY - 2010/6/17

Y1 - 2010/6/17

N2 - Tension has been rapidly rising in the past decade between the expanding religious fundamentalist forces in Hong Kong and glocalized movements of sexual rights. Normative institutions including faith-based organizations and megachurches, often joining hands with government bureaucracies, have adopted activist strategies to act in unprecedented unison, and with great speed, triggering waves of moral panic in their umbrella campaigns against sexual minorities and representations including but not limited to pornography, sex workers' and Tongzhi movements. In response to the leftist discourse of moral panic, Christian fundamentalist groups in Hong Kong have coined the alleged liberal critique of morality as "freedom panic" in order to preempt and rationalize their own fears and moralistic stances. "At this moment, we really need not produce 'freedom panic' and should not seek to demoralize Hong Kong society. Rather, we should reaffirm the significant role of morality in our free society, and continue to work hard to find a balance between the two poles" (Hong Kong Sex Culture Society newsletter January 2009). This paper seeks to map the development of cultural discourses within the post-1997 Hong Kong Christian fundamentalist movement. It traces how this movement has learned and modified the lingo of the US Christian Right while it has worked to localize its discourses, restabilize their stronghold and perpetuate their privileges by carefully picking its enemies and reinventing/manipulating the fears of its constituents. Through this analysis, it investigates the movement's complex strategies in blurring the lines between the personal and the political, between politics and religion, and between morality and spirituality.

AB - Tension has been rapidly rising in the past decade between the expanding religious fundamentalist forces in Hong Kong and glocalized movements of sexual rights. Normative institutions including faith-based organizations and megachurches, often joining hands with government bureaucracies, have adopted activist strategies to act in unprecedented unison, and with great speed, triggering waves of moral panic in their umbrella campaigns against sexual minorities and representations including but not limited to pornography, sex workers' and Tongzhi movements. In response to the leftist discourse of moral panic, Christian fundamentalist groups in Hong Kong have coined the alleged liberal critique of morality as "freedom panic" in order to preempt and rationalize their own fears and moralistic stances. "At this moment, we really need not produce 'freedom panic' and should not seek to demoralize Hong Kong society. Rather, we should reaffirm the significant role of morality in our free society, and continue to work hard to find a balance between the two poles" (Hong Kong Sex Culture Society newsletter January 2009). This paper seeks to map the development of cultural discourses within the post-1997 Hong Kong Christian fundamentalist movement. It traces how this movement has learned and modified the lingo of the US Christian Right while it has worked to localize its discourses, restabilize their stronghold and perpetuate their privileges by carefully picking its enemies and reinventing/manipulating the fears of its constituents. Through this analysis, it investigates the movement's complex strategies in blurring the lines between the personal and the political, between politics and religion, and between morality and spirituality.

M3 - Conference Paper (other)

ER -

YAU C. Who is this wonderful battle really fighting? (Or, what the Hong Kong Christian fundamentalists didn’t tell you). 2010. Paper presented at 8th Crossroads in Cultural Studies Conference, Hong Kong, Hong Kong.