Women employment in colonial Hong Kong

K. M., William LEE

    Research output: Journal PublicationsJournal Article (refereed)Researchpeer-review

    10 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Women's participation in the labour market is on the rise, and employment opportunities available to working women have increased greatly. However, working women in Hong Kong are still disproportionately underrepresented in higher status occupations. Despite general improvement in their educational attainment, women are still unequally paid. Their role in the workplace is still very much constrained and impeded by their familial role. Hong Kong women's continuing subordination in the workplace lies in the domination of the Chinese patriarchal family in industrial Hong Kong. Women experience institutional discrimination insofar as other institutions and the public at large also subscribe to culturally entrenched prejudices and discriminatory practices against women. It appears that women's subordinate status will not change in the foreseeable future.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)246-264
    Number of pages19
    JournalJournal of Contemporary Asia
    Volume30
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2000

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    women's employment
    Hong Kong
    working woman
    workplace
    employment opportunity
    domination
    prejudice
    occupation
    discrimination
    labor market
    participation
    experience

    Cite this

    LEE, K. M., William. / Women employment in colonial Hong Kong. In: Journal of Contemporary Asia. 2000 ; Vol. 30, No. 2. pp. 246-264.
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    Women employment in colonial Hong Kong. / LEE, K. M., William.

    In: Journal of Contemporary Asia, Vol. 30, No. 2, 01.01.2000, p. 246-264.

    Research output: Journal PublicationsJournal Article (refereed)Researchpeer-review

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