Work-life balance : promises made and promises kept

John S. HEYWOOD, W. S. SIEBERT, Xiangdong WEI

Research output: Journal PublicationsJournal Article (refereed)Researchpeer-review

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We present evidence on the association between the management practices conventionally identified with high performance workplaces (HPWs) and measures of work–life balance. Our framework identifies those practices associated with workers reporting that their employer makes work–life balance commitments, and separately identifies those practices associated with workers reporting that their employer keeps the commitments they make. Our results do not support a role for HPWs in either the making or the keeping of work–life balance commitments. Rather, they suggest that where workers are interdependent – as in team production – the resulting inflexibility of time scheduling drives down work–life balance commitments.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1976-1995
Number of pages20
JournalInternational Journal of Human Resource Management
Volume21
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Sep 2010

Fingerprint

Scheduling
Work-life balance
Workers
Employers
High performance workplace

Keywords

  • high performance workplaces
  • motivation
  • work incentives
  • work–life balance

Cite this

HEYWOOD, John S. ; SIEBERT, W. S. ; WEI, Xiangdong. / Work-life balance : promises made and promises kept. In: International Journal of Human Resource Management. 2010 ; Vol. 21, No. 11. pp. 1976-1995.
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Work-life balance : promises made and promises kept. / HEYWOOD, John S.; SIEBERT, W. S.; WEI, Xiangdong.

In: International Journal of Human Resource Management, Vol. 21, No. 11, 01.09.2010, p. 1976-1995.

Research output: Journal PublicationsJournal Article (refereed)Researchpeer-review

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