Work stress and depression : the direct and moderating effects of informal social support and coping

Weiqing CHEN, Oi Ling SIU, Jiafang LU, Cary L. COOPER, David Rosser PHILLIPS

Research output: Journal PublicationsJournal Article (refereed)Researchpeer-review

33 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article investigated the relationship between job stressors and employee mental health (depression). It also examined the direct and moderating effects of informal social support (objective and subjective) and coping (active coping, overeating and drinking, passivity, and distancing) on the relationships. Survey data were collected from 843 employees in eight types of domestic- and foreign-invested enterprises in China. Hierarchical regression analyses revealed that increased exposure to job stressors was directly associated with higher levels of depression. Subjective informal social support and passivity were found to have direct effect on employees' depression. Further, objective informal social support and distancing buffered the negative effect of job stressors on depression. The theoretical and practical implications of these findings are discussed in the paper.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)431-443
Number of pages13
JournalStress and Health
Volume25
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2009

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Social Support
Depression
Hyperphagia
Occupational Health
Drinking
China
Mental Health
Regression Analysis

Cite this

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Work stress and depression : the direct and moderating effects of informal social support and coping. / CHEN, Weiqing; SIU, Oi Ling; LU, Jiafang; COOPER, Cary L.; PHILLIPS, David Rosser.

In: Stress and Health, Vol. 25, No. 5, 01.12.2009, p. 431-443.

Research output: Journal PublicationsJournal Article (refereed)Researchpeer-review

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AU - PHILLIPS, David Rosser

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