Yoshizawa Kenkichi and the Soviet-Japanese non-aggression pact proposal

Research output: Journal PublicationsJournal Article (refereed)Researchpeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

While the developments leading up to the signature of the Soviet-Japanese Neutrality Pact in April 1941 have received considerable attention from scholars, the antecedents of this pact, the discussions between Japan and Soviet Russia over non-aggression or neutrality agreements from the mid-1920s onwards, are less widely known. The most significant of the earlier initiatives came in December 1931, when Soviet Foreign Commissar, Maxim Litvinov, proposed a pact of non-aggression to the Japanese Foreign Minister designate, Yoshizawa Kenkichi. Subsequently, at the International Military Tribunal for the Far East, a Soviet legal expert was to argue that the Japanese refusal to accept this proposal was proof of their aggressive plans for war on the Soviet Union.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)111-127
Number of pages17
JournalModern Asian Studies
Volume14
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 1980
Externally publishedYes

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non-aggression
neutrality
Far East
minister
USSR
Russia
Japan
Military
expert
Pact
plan
Neutrality

Cite this

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Yoshizawa Kenkichi and the Soviet-Japanese non-aggression pact proposal. / BRIDGES, Brian.

In: Modern Asian Studies, Vol. 14, No. 1, 02.1980, p. 111-127.

Research output: Journal PublicationsJournal Article (refereed)Researchpeer-review

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